Faculty Publications

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    Teaching For Success (2016)

    Authored by Brad Olsen

    Teaching For Success is a comprehensive guide for navigating the process of becoming an effective teacher in the wake of contemporary and systemic challenges. Focusing on the core concept of teacher identity in clear, invigorating prose, the book illuminates how teachers can arrange, adjust, and assemble their own personal and professional teaching influences in conjunction with educational research into a coherent, unique, and successful whole. Olsen’s attention to classroom practice, social justice issues, personal satisfaction, and teacher success stories offers a sharp and useful guide for teacher development. This revised second edition has been updated and includes a new chapter that guides both new and experienced teachers through emerging, thorny issues in educational policy and practice, including high-stakes testing, blended learning, the demands of networking, and the Common Core State Standards. Read more. 

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    Language and Communication in Mathematics Education (2018)

    Authored by Judit Moschkovich

    This book considers some of the outstanding questions regarding language and communication in the teaching and learning of mathematics – an established theme in mathematics education research, which is growing in prominence. Recent research has demonstrated the wide range of theoretical and methodological resources that can contribute to this area of study, including those drawing on cross-disciplinary perspectives influenced by, among others, sociology, psychology, linguistics, and semiotics. Read more.

      

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    Reframing Sociocultural Research on Literacy: Identity, Agency, and Power (2007)

    Authored by Cynthia Lewis

    This landmark volume articulates and develops the argument that new directions in sociocultural theory are needed in order to address important issues of identity, agency, and power that are central to understanding literacy research and literacy learning as social and cultural practices. With an overarching focus on the research process as it relates to sociocultural research, the book is organized around two themes: conceptual frameworks and knowledge sources.
    *Part I, “Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks,” offers new theoretical lenses for reconsidering key concepts traditionally associated with sociocultural theory, such as activity, history, community, and the ways they are conceptualized and under-conceptualized within sociocultural theory.
    *Part II, “Rethinking Knowledge and Representation,” considers the tensions and possibilities related to how research knowledge is produced, represented, and disseminated or shared—challenging the locus of authority in research relationships, asking who is authorized to be a legitimate knowledge source, for what purposes, and for which audiences or stakeholders. Read more.

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    Unsettling Research Ethics: A Collaborative Conference Report (2016)

    Edited by Ronald David Glass

    Included in this report are learning tools like innovative cases, games, heat maps, and other materials designed for deep engagement with fraught ethical matters.

    The Unsettling Research Ethics conference was an intergenerational gathering, with both early career and foundational scholars in anthropology, archaeology, critical race and ethnic studies, black studies, computer science, education, feminist studies, geography, public health, sociology, and philosophy. Participating scholars identify as scholar-activists and/or engage in work related to research ethics, community-based and collaborative approaches to research, and ethics policy work at institutional, professional association, and national levels. Community leaders in attendance have collaboratively partnered with academics, and work in multiple domains of social justice activism and community organizing, including labor, race, women’s issues, immigration, and youth development. Read more. 

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    Voices of Indigenour Oaxacan Youth in the Central Valley: Creating Our Sense of Belonging in California (2013)

    Authored by Juan Santiago

    Edited by Ronald David Glass

    This two-year participatory action research project documented and analyzed the civic engagement decisions and practices of Mexican indigenous migrant young adults in the central region of California’s San Joaquin Valley. Read more.

      

     

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    The Teaching Instinct: Explorations Into What Makes Us Human (2016)

    Authored by Kip Tellez

    How we select, prepare, and support teachers has become a surprisingly common topic among journalists, politicians, and policymakers. Contemporary recommendations on teaching and teachers, whatever their intentions, fail to assess this deeply human activity from its historical roots. In The Teaching Instinct: Explorations Into What Makes Us Human, Kip Téllez invites us to reappraise teaching through a wide lens and argues that our capacity to teach is one part culture, two parts genetic. By rescuing the field of instinct psychology from the margins, this challenging book explores topics as diverse as teaching in other species, teaching across human cultures, and the development of teaching in young children, finally drawing readers into a discussion about how our teaching instinct influences modern teacher learning, selection, and preparation. Drawing on disciplines as diverse as comparative biology, evolutionary psychology, and teacher education policy, Téllez warns us that ignoring or contradicting our teaching instinct results in unhappy teachers and dysfunctional school systems. Read more.

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    Amplifying the Curriculum: Designing Quality Learning Opportunities for English Learners (2019)

    Edited by George C. Bunch

    This book presents an ambitious model for how educators can design high-quality, challenging, and supportive learning opportunities for English Learners and other students identified to be in need of language and literacy support. Starting with the premise that conceptual, analytic, and language practices develop simultaneously as students engage in disciplinary learning, the authors argue for instruction that amplifies―rather than simplifies―expectations, concepts, texts, and learning tasks. The authors offer clear guidance for designing lessons and units and provide examples that demonstrate the approach in various subject areas, including math, science, English, and social studies. This practical resource will guide teachers through the coherent design of tasks, lessons, and units of study that invite English Learners (and all students) to engage in productive, meaningful, and intellectually engaging activity. Read more.

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    Migrant Teachers: How American Schools Import Labor (2014)

    Authored by Lora Bartlett

    Migrant Teachers investigates an overlooked trend in U.S. schools today: the growing reliance on teachers trained overseas. This timely study maps the shifting landscape of American education, as federal mandates require K-12 schools to employ qualified teachers or risk funding cuts. Lora Bartlett asserts that a narrowly technocratic view of teachers as subject specialists has spurred some public school districts to look abroad. When these districts use overseas-trained teachers as transient, migrant labor, the teachers have little opportunity to connect well with their students, thereby reducing the effectiveness of their teaching. Read more.

     

     

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    Cultures of Doing Good: Anthropologists and NGOs (2017)

    Authored by Amanda Lashaw

    Cultures of Doing Good: Anthropologists and NGOs serves as a foundational text to advance a growing subfield of social science inquiry: the anthropology of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Thorough introductory chapters provide a short history of NGO anthropology, address how the study of NGOs contributes to anthropology more broadly, and examine ways that anthropological studies of NGOs expand research agendas spawned by other disciplines. In addition, the theoretical concepts and debates that have anchored the analysis of NGOs since they entered scholarly discourse after World War II are explained. Read more.